Monthly Archives: October 2012

For the love of Wired Wednesday!

Nothing I love more on Wednesday than the Wired Wednesday iced double mocha lattes at Cup A Joe on Hillsborough Street near NCSU in Raleigh, NC. They really get me going to make it until Friday!

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So I tried to make samosas…

You know I love Indian food. The spicy, earthy flavors are wonderful! Cumin, curry powder, and turmeric all add an earthy, spicyness to Indian food. I decided to try to make samosas at home. A samosa is a fried or baked pastry filled with a savory filling. Sometimes they are called hand pies, dumplings , or turnovers. Just depends where and who is making them.

Arthur’s Samosas

1) While olive oil is heating you can make the dough. Mix the butter, flour, salt, and baking soda.

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2) Cut the butter into small cubes. Incorporate the flour and butter until it forms a lumpy dough. I added a tablespoon of buttermilk because everything taste better with a little buttermilk!

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3) cut the dough in half and form into a disk. Return to the refrigerator to chill.

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4) The onions should be soft now so you can at the vegetables. I cheated and used two cans of mixed vegetables in addition to a tablespoon each of cumin, turmeric, and curry powder. Cook for about 10 or 15 minutes and then turn the heat off.

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5) Remove the dough from the refrigerator.

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6) Roll the disk out to about a quarter inch thickness.

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7) Use the back of the dumpling maker to cut the dough out.

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8) Place the cut out dough in the front side of the dumpling maker and press in the center to make a pocket. Place a teaspoon of filling in the pocket.

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9) Folder the dumpling maker to close and seal the samosa.

I had a problem with the crease cracking when I folded the maker over so I decided to make the remainder of them using the old fashioned cookie cutter.

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This produced a nicer shape and then I folded and crimped them by hand.

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10) Bake them for about 15 minutes at 350f. You could fry them, too, for crunchy skin but I hate frying anything!

The filling was perfect but the dough was very soft and moist. It fell apart easily and was very sweet. Next time I think I will use less butter!

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But it’s a beginning of a good recipe.

 

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Why gloves are your best friend when working with Trifoliate Orange.

Tools help a gardener succeed. Most of us don’t treat our tools with respect. I often leave them out on the patio. They rust. I rarely sharpen or oil them. I am not the Martha Stewart of tool maintainance.

I don’t like wearing gloves because I get a better feel of what I am doing with my hands. Unfortunately, I forget that I should use them with plants that have thorns or sharp leaves.

I was reminded of this when I was removing Carolina Jasmine from a Trifoliate Orange the other day. Several large thorns pierced my hands several times while I was trying to untangle and remove the vines. It drew plenty of blood!

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Its also time to begin feeding the birds again. The migratory birds will be passing through all Fall. Its a great time for birdwatching these rare visitors. I placed several Niger Seed feeders around the yard. You can purchase sock feeders filled with this small black seed that birds love. I also have wire feeders that I keep filled with black sunflower seeds all year. Northern Cardinals love them!

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Small birds love the Niger seed and will flock to these socks. They usually empty them with in a few days. They are inexpensive and easy to use. 

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The small seed is more expensive than other seed and dries out quickly so only purchase what you will use or the amount the birds will eat within a week. Once it dries out most birds will not eat it.

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